The Mandalorians

Mandalorians on Galidraan, from Jango Fett Open Seasons, Dark Horse ComicsThe explanation of the Mandalorian culture goes all the way back to a species known as the Taungs. While they died out, there culture lived on.

The Mandalorian Culture was based on fighting against worthy foes in battle to gain honor. They accepted members based on adoption. Anyone of any age could be adopted in either by choice or conquest. They were strong believers in family and took them with them even into combat.

Their homeworld, such as they accepted, was Mandalore, though they also had colonies. Among them was Concord Dawn. But Mandalorians were largely nomads.

From ancient times, they collided with The Old Republic and Jedi, sometimes siding with the Sith. In the more modern era, they were hired as mercenaries and known for their skill. Their ancient besalisk war droids were famous, as were their ship skills and armor skills.

Eventually, Jaster Mereel attempted to restore honor to the Mandalorian by reinstituting warrior codes long forgotten. This was resisted by a group called the Death Watch. He was eventually killed.

Jaster’s surviving group members where betrayed by a man who hired them. Jedi, tricked into believing them terrorists, killed all but one on Galidraan, who had been duped into believing them terrorists. More than half the Jedi were killed. One of the surviving Jedi was Dooku. The surviving Mandalorian was Jango Fett, who was sold into slavery by the man he was delivered too. This would have long term consequences for everyone. Dooku’s disillusionment with the Jedi began when he realized the mistake. Jango Fett swore revenge and eventually escaped.. By joining forces, Jango provided for the newly christened Lord Tyrannus the DNA for a clone army…which would be used to betray the Jedi. He also demanded in payment one unaltered clone: Boba Fett, who he raised as a son and would become a famous bounty hunter.

Due to The Clone Wars TV show Mandalorian history becomes confused. In the show they are depicted as blond humans on a world destroyed by war and enclosed by domes, led by a neutral non warring government. However, even in the show it’s revealed that this is not how they always were and many are dissatisfied.

The Clone troopers of the Republic in  many cases were trained by Mandalorians and adopted their culture, as Jango Fett was Mandalorian by adoption.

The true leader was known as the Mandalore.

During the Imperial  years, the Empire cracked down on the world and enslaved its people to mine its famous iron. Fenn Shysa became Mandalore and formed a resistance. After the war, Fenn Shysa’s dying wish was for Boba Fett to become Mandalore, which he did.

Fett led them into a two sided battle during the Yuuzhan Vong invasion, pretending to work for the enemy but secretly aiding the New Republic. The retaliation devastated the world but the Mandalorians scattered throughout the galaxy heeded the call to return and rebuild it.

Central to their way of life was the Resol’nare’, 6 important codes of conduct and honor. These included:

  • speaking the Mandalorian language
  • wearing the armor
  • defending the family and self
  • raise your children to be Mandalorian
  • contribute to one’s clan
  • rally to the call of the Mandalore

Actions are far more important to being Mandalorian than one’s past history or birthplace. For someone to become Mandalorian, their past is considered wiped clean to begin anew.

Famous Mandalorians Include (but aren’t limited to):

Mandalore the Indomitable  who was defeated by Uliq Qel Droma and joined the Sith in the war led by Exar Kun.

Canderous Ordo – fought both against and alongside Revan. Mercenary

Rohlan Dyre – aka Rohlan the Questioner

Demagol – war criminal

Jaster Mereel – created the supercommando codex, seeking to restore the honor of the commands though bringing back the warrior codes.

Tor Viszla – founder of the Death Watch, a warrior group who opposed Jaster Mereel’s reforms.

Jango Fett – adopted by Jaster Mereel after the death of his family, Mandalore, and template for the Clone army of the Republic.

Fenn Shysa – Mandalore during the Imperial years and after

Boba Fett – didn’t at first care to learn his heritage, but eventually returned to it and became Mandalore.

Kal Skirata – trainer of Clones, he went on to help set up a system for clone defectors trying to flee both the Old Republic and the Empire at the end of the Clone Wars.

Stories involving Mandalorean Culture (note: not including multiple Boba Fett strictly about Bounty hunting stories…saving that for the Boba Fett character page.) :

The Mando’a language is commonly used in the stories. Here is a Mando dictionary.

Dark Horse Comics

Knights of the Old Republic: Daze of Hate

Knights of the Old Republic: Knights of Suffering

Knights of the Old Republic: War

Star Wars: Jango Fett

Star Wars: Zam Wesell (note, this is sequel to Jango Fett and does include him.)

Jango Fett: Open Seasons

Blood Ties Jango and Boba Fett

Blood Ties Boba Fett is Dead

Bantam

The Bounty Hunter Wars Trilogy

A Barve like That (Tales from Jabba’s Palace)

Del Rey

Republic Commando: Hard Contact

Republic Commando: Triple Zero

Republic Commando: True Colors

Republic Commando: Order 66

Imperial Commando: 501st

Legacy of the Force Bloodlines

Legacy of the Force Sacrifice

Legacy of the Force Revelation

Scholastic

Boba Fett: The Fight to Survive

Boba Fett: Crossfire

Boba Fett: Maze of Deception

Boba Fett: Hunted

Boba Fett: A New Threat

Boba Fett: Pursuit

 

 

 

 

 

Kenobi Review

Kenobi Book Cover Kenobi
John Jackson Miller
Del Rey
2013
Hardcover

The Republic has fallen
The Sith Lords rule the galaxy.
Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi has lost everything.
Everything but hope.

Tatooine—a harsh desert world where farmers toil in the heat of two suns while trying to protect themselves and their loved ones from the marauding Tusken Raiders. A backwater planet on the edge of civilized space. And an unlikely place to find a Jedi Master in hiding, or an orphaned infant boy on whose tiny shoulders rests the future of a galaxy.

Known to locals only as “Ben,” the bearded and robed offworlder is an enigmatic stranger who keeps to himself, shares nothing of his past, and goes to great pains to remain an outsider. But as tensions escalate between the farmers and a tribe of Sand People led by a ruthless war chief, Ben finds himself drawn into the fight, endangering the very mission that brought him to Tatooine.

Ben—Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi, hero of the Clone Wars, traitor to the Empire, and protector of the galaxy’s last hope—can no more turn his back on evil than he can reject his Jedi training. And when blood is unjustly spilled, innocent lives threatened, and a ruthless opponent unmasked, Ben has no choice but to call on the wisdom of the Jedi—and the formidable power of the Force—in his never-ending fight for justice.

How does a Jedi Master, a servant of Justice disappear? Not easily, when the Force keeps putting him right in the middle of trouble.
Wanting nothing more than to blend in, Obi-Wan finds himself discovering (or rediscovering) that for some people, there is trouble and drama enough in their neighborhood and those struggles are enough without galaxy wide wars, Empires and Republics and Jedi and Sith.

This is truly a ‘western’ of the Star Wars galaxy, with the colonists a mishmash of species (though mostly human), Tusken Raiders replacing the Native American Indians, and the Hutt henchmen for the outlaws.

The story is told from Anileen’s point of view, except for Obi-Wan’s meditations. It would be nice to have more of him, but it does work. We get to see where ‘crazy wizard’ idea began.

Obi-Wan finds an unlikely new friend in Anileen, who needs him as much as he needs her. It’s not a romantic friendship. But it is awkward as he can’t afford to be noticed. And just as an additional jolt her nickname is Annie…reminding him of the ‘Ani’ that he lost. He is wrestling with his own guilt, regret and loss of family as well as how to disappear and still watch over the young Luke Skywalker. How can he still be Kenobi, the servant of light and justice, yet sit by while injustice is done before his very nose?

This book is a nice change of pace. Obi-Wan himself is struggling with that very ‘change of pace’ he is so unaccustomed too just as we might wonder if a book without the blasterfire of rebellion, the starship action and lightsabers is really interesting enough.. But being here gives him the opportunity to grow to understand Anakin Skywalker, belatedly, in a way he never did before.

In regards to continuity, it makes some nice compensations for the changes the prequels made.
For instance:
In the Illustrated Star Wars Galaxy and in Junior Jedi Knights it was established that tusken male and female were equal, both were warriors and they couldn’t always be told apart.
In Attack of the Clones, however, the distinctions were obvious: males were the warriors and wore different gear.
By making use of  the influence of Sharad Hett from the Dark Horse comics (Asharad has apparently not reappeared at this point) we see how a transition began. Anakin Skywalker’s reaction to his Mother’s death definitely clinched it. Taking what was a contradiction and using that very contradiction to explain why things changed.
It  also mentions that Qui-Gon told Obi-Wan stories of Jedi, separated from the Order, and how they lived: Kerra Holt (Knight Errant) and Zayne Carrik (KOTOR Comics). Siri (Jedi Apprentice) is mentioned as Obi-Wan’s first test on turning away from love for duty. Satine of The Clone Wars is mentioned, but no details given so if you aren’t into The Clone Wars its not really a problem.

Other Stories about these Characters and Places

Other stories that touch on Kenobi’s life on Tatooine:

  • The Last One Standing – Jude Watson, only available in the paperback combo version of Legacy of the Jedi & Secrets of the Jedi
  • The Last of the Jedi: Desperate Mission – Jude Watson, book 1
  • The Last of the Jedi: Reckoning – Jude Watson book 10 (one chapter)
  • The Life and Times of Obi-Wan Kenobi – Ryder Windham
  • Legacy: Claws of the Dragon 3, 4 : John Ostrander (Author) Jan Duursema  (Artist) Dark Horse Comics issue 16

Stories about Obi-Wan before Tatooine:

  • Jedi Apprentice – Jude Watson
  • Last Stand on Ord Mantell – Dark Horse Comics
  • The Aurorient Express – Dark Horse Comics
  • Jedi Council Acts of War -(Dark Horse Comics)
  • Stark Hyperspace War – (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Legacy of the Jedi – Jude Watson
  • Secrets of the Jedi – Jude Watson
  • Episode 1 : Obi-Wan Kenobi – (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Rogue Planet – Greg Bear
  • Jedi Quest – – Jude Watson
  • The Approaching Storm – Alan Dean Foster
  • Precipice (Hyperspace short)
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars video game
  • Star Wars: Republic 50: The Defense of Kamino (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Star Wars: Republic: The New Face of War (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Star Wars: Republic 53: Blast Radius (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Clone Wars Micro Series (TV/DVD)
  • Star Wars: Clone Wars Adventures Volume 1 – “Blind Force” (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Star Wars: Clone Wars Adventures Volume 8 – “One of a Kind” (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Storm Fleet Warnings
  • The Cestus Deception
  • The Hive (add on to paperback of The Cestus Deception)
  • Star Wars: Republic: The Battle of Jabiim (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Star Wars: Republic 59: Enemy Lines (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Star Wars: Republic 62: No Man’s Land (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Boba Fett – The Fight to Survive
  • Star Wars: Republic 67: Forever Young (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Changing Seasons – Timothy Zahn, Star Wars Insider
  • Star Wars: Republic: Dreadnaughts of Rendili (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Star Wars: Obsession (Dark Horse Comics)
  •  Star Wars: Clone Wars Adventures Volume 4 – “The Brink” (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Star Wars: Clone Wars Adventures Volume 9 – “Appetite for Adventure” (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Star Wars: Clone Wars Adventures Volume 10 – “Thunder Road” (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Brothers in Arms  (Dark Horse Comics)
  • The Last of the Jedi: Dark Warning
  • Labyrinth of Evil – James Luceno

The Clone Wars TV series also has many episodes (some contradictory) involving Obi-Wan
Novels based on that include:

  • TCW Gambit: Stealth – Karen Miller
  • TCW Gambit: Seige – Karen Miller
  • TCW Wild Space – Karen Miller

Other Stories involving Tusken Raiders/Tatooine:

  • Star Wars Republic: Outlander (Dark Horse comics)
  • The Illustrated Star Wars Universe – Kevin J. Anderson, art by Ralph McQuarrie
  • The Life and Times of Luke Skywalker
  • Tales of the Mos Eisley Cantina (Anthology)
  • Tatooine Ghost, by Troy Denning
  • Junior Jedi Knights 3: Promises – Nancy Richardson Fischer

Qui-Gon Jinn Extended

Qui-Gon prepares for battle.

Qui-Gon prepares for battle.

Qui-Gon Jinn is a Jedi considered a bit of a maverick by the Jedi council because he doesn’t always follow the Code. He focused more on the Living Force than on the Unifying Force. He was secretly learning how to be able to allow himself in the living Force after death.
Qui Gon Jinn was trained by Dooku, who later left the Order and fell to the Dark Side. Qui-Gon had at least 2 padawans. His first, Xanatos, left him and the Order. This is detailed in a Dark Horse Graphic novel called Dark Side and several of the Jedi Apprentice books.

His second was Obi-Wan Kenobi. The two balanced each other.  They shared many missions, including missions to restore peace, expose corruption, and taking on pirate gangs. They shared battles during the Stark Hyperspace Conflict, the attack by the Yinchorri against the Jedi, a plot against Valorum on Ord Mantell and activities involving the Trade Federation and the piracy of Nebula Front.

Spoiler for Jedi Apprentice: The Ties that Bind
Qui-Gon Jinn and Tahl, Dark Horse's Dark Side Comic.

Qui-Gon Jinn and Tahl, Dark Horse’s Dark Side Comic. Artist: Stéphane Roux

Legacy of the Jedi, from Dooku to Anakin

Legacy of the Jedi a story spanning from Dooku & Qui-Gon to Obi-Wan & Anakin, by Jude Watson

On his last mission, it was Obi-Wan who sensed distant danger on going in to negotiate with the Trade Federation to end the blockade of Naboo.  But it was Qui Gon who immediately realized there was no logic to their actions, no apparent gain, when they invaded, given that gain is their usual motive.
Qui Gon Jinn was also the one who discovered young Anakin Skywalker on Tatooine, and urged the Jedi Council to train him.
On Qui-Gon’s death, his last act was to ask Obi-Wan to train him.

Afterward Qui-Gon tried to call out to Anakin when his mother died, alerting Yoda that he was somehow able to connect from the beyond. He appeared in a vision to Yoda, leading young Anakin (though he was grown at this time) into a tree on a mysterious planet to face his fears. He also appeared on Mortis to Obi-Wan and finally Yoda was able to hear his voice in deep meditation. Qui-Gon led him to those who were training him in how to manifest his spirit after death to guide the next generation.

Featured In:

Jedi Council (DH)
Last Stand on Ord Mantell (DH)
Murder on the Aurorient Express (DH)
Dark Side (DH) based on mentioned events in Jedi Apprentice
Stark Hyperspace wars

Jedi Apprentice Series
Cloak of Deception

Appeared Briefly in:
Clone Wars microseries
The Clone Wars Mortis story arc
Darth Maul Shadow Hunter